Two books that changed my practice

For two weeks, I have been debating which books to share. Teachers don't have a lot of time on their hands, so when you recommend a book, it had better be powerful and worthwhile.

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I started blogging five years ago during a class I took at Michigan State University. Even though the topics were chosen for my classmates and me, the benefits of those blog posts prevail and are what keep me coming back to WordPress to post. Consolidation of Thoughts Teachers have so many thoughts going through their... Continue Reading →

Nail that interview

As I am currently in the midst of my job hunt, this topic is at the forefront of my mind. Every day I am either applying for jobs or writing cover letters or praying to Santa that I get a job at a great school with lovely people. Pretty much. There are a lot of... Continue Reading →

The balance between chaos and order

Maybe it's the change of seasons; maybe it's the fact an educator has a haul of ten weeks straight, without even a long weekend; maybe it's the realization that there is not a single month of a school year that is calm (even though we tell ourselves there is...every month); maybe it's the knowledge that... Continue Reading →

The Evolving Educator

Katie Martin kicks off her book, Learner-Centered Innovation, connecting with educators about the real double life that students find themselves in today. She quotes Will Richardson's article that shares a student's perspective as they describe themselves and their peers as the 'lost generation.' I mean, really. Which classroom would you rather be in...as a student? Are we... Continue Reading →

I don’t know much, but I know…

When you're young, you think you know everything. Or, maybe that's just me. I started my teaching career confident that my college had prepared me for anything that could be thrown at me. I was 21-years-old and ready to teach! Ha! With each year that followed, I grew more humble. I continue to realize how... Continue Reading →

Mindset is Everything

In a previous post, I mentioned that we know grades on papers decrease students' motivation. I've seen it in my room and I'm confident other teachers will agree that once a grade is on a piece of student work, the likelihood that the student will actually look at their mistakes and fix/improve their work is minimal... Continue Reading →

All learners matter

At the end of each chapter in Katie Novak's book, UDL Now!, she asks quality questions that make you reflect on your practice and push your thinking. This blog post is an organization of my thoughts on a question from the book's very first chapter: Think of all the teaching initiatives you have been encouraged to try in... Continue Reading →

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